After several months of disruption due to Covid-19, Nunavut’s restaurants, bars, recreation centres and arenas can reopen their doors to the public as of Monday, but with numerous conditions, Nunavut’s chief public health officer Dr. Michael Patterson revealed.

Many public buildings and businesses can reopen to the public so long as restrictions are observed, chief public health officer Dr. Michael Patterson announced Monday.
NNSL file photo

Dining in food establishments is limited to seating of no more than 75 per cent of regular capacity. Two metres or more of separation is required between tables and between customers waiting for counter service. No more than six people can gather around a table.

Similar measures are in place for bars, although the Government of Nunavut (GN) stated that this order doesn’t apply to the Iqaluit Beer and Wine Store or any other liquor store operated by the Nunavut Liquor and Cannabis Commission.

Recreation centres, gyms, fitness centres, cadet halls, libraries, museums and galleries can host 50 per cent of their normal limits, or a maximum of 25 people.

Arenas are also restricted to 50 per cent of capacity for each room to a total of 50 people. Likewise, a maximum of 50 spectators are permitted.

Residents at long-term care, continuing care, and medical boarding homes may have two visitors at once from immediate family, but visitors must wear masks or face coverings.

Park buildings may now open.

The outdoor gathering limit increases to 100 persons, as long as social distancing is practised.

Indoor gatherings in dwellings are allowed for up to 15 people.

For places of worship, government meetings and meetings arranged by Inuit organizations at community halls, conference facilities, rental meeting spaces and theatres, up to 100 people can gather, or 75 per cent of the rated capacity of the room.

Fines for not complying with these measures can result in fines of $575 per person and $2,875 for corporations.

 

 

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Derek Neary

Derek Neary has been reporting on developments in the North for 18 years. When he's not writing for Nunavut News, he's working on Northern News Services' special publications such as Opportunities North,...