Makigiaqta funds nine Inuit training projects

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Nine projects are approved for roughly $12.6 million in funding from the Makigiaqta Inuit Training Corporation as a result of an open call issued in the fall of 2017.

photo courtesy of Nunavut Fisheries and Marine Training Consortium
The Nunavut Fisheries and Marine Training Consortium, whose Kisarvik program students are seen here in March during firefighting training in Iqaluit, received $2,862,000 from the Makigiaqta Inuit Training Corporation to continue delivering marine and fisheries training to Inuit.

“Now that Makigiaqta is adequately staffed to support Inuit focused projects, I look forward to seeing efforts to enhance the preparedness of Nunavut Inuit to participate in employment,” stated Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. (NTI) president Aluki Kotierk in a news release.

The training corporation’s board of directors made their decision from 37 proposals under four strategic priority areas – early learning systems, wrap-around support for success in education, foundational skills development opportunities for adults, and advanced training and post-secondary opportunities for employment in key sectors.

There are three funding categories – three-year, two-year and one-year projects.

Three-year project funding of $875,000 goes to the Recreation Parks Association of Nunavut for its youth recreation strategy, $2,862,000 to the Nunavut Fisheries and Marine Training Consortium for continued delivery of training to adults in the marine and fisheries industry, $4,401,900 to Inspire Nunavut to train young people across Nunavut to become social and traditional entrepreneurs, $1,619,000 to the Nunavut Film Development Corporation for a territorial film industry training program and $1,275,000 to the Qajuqturvik Food Center to deliver accredited culinary training via the Inclusion Cafe.

Two-year project funding of $422,706 goes to Nunavut Sivuniksavut to offer a third-year Advanced Inuit Studies Program and $782,000 to the Kugluktuk Katimayeen Hamlet of Kugluktuk and Elder Centre Corporation for 30 health-care aide positions to support long-term elder care in the community.

Songwriting and music production workshops by Nunavut Hitmakerz and employment support programs for Inuit youth by Performance Management Consultants receive one-year funding of $75,625 and $294,060 respectively.

Makigiaqta was formed in January 2016 using $175 million in funds secured through a settlement agreement of a $1-billion land claim implementation lawsuit launched by NTI in 2006.

Makigiaqta will continue to examine the systemic changes that are required to encourage and support Inuit employment, according to the release.

“The Government of Nunavut is pleased with the progress of the Makigiaqta Inuit Training Corporation. As the work of the corporation continues, the government looks forward to more opportunities to enhance educational and training options for Inuit in Nunavut,” stated then-Premier Paul Quassa.

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Michele LeTourneau first arrived at NNSL's headquarters in Yellowknife in1998, with a BA honours in Theatre. For four years she documented the arts across the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Following a very short stint as a communications officer with the Government of the Northwest Territories, Michele spent a decade at a community-based environmental monitoring board in the mining industry, where she worked with Inuit, Chipewyan, Tlicho, Yellowknives Dene and Metis elders to help develop traditional knowledge and Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit contributions for monitoring and management plans. She rejoined NNSL and moved to Iqaluit in May 2014 to write for Nunavut News. Michele has received a dozen awards for her work with NNSL.