Louise Flaherty resigns as Nunavut’s DM of Education

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Education Deputy Minister (DM) Louise Flaherty has resigned her position.

Louise Flaherty has resigned as deputy minister of Education to focus her energy on creating resources and books for Nunavummiut, said Premier Joe Savikataaq June 11.
photo courtesy Inhabit Media

“I have accepted Louise Flaherty’s resignation, so she can focus her energy to create resources and books for Nunavummiut. While we are sad to lose her, we wish her all the best and know that her passion for Inuit language and culture will benefit our territory in other ways,” stated Premier Joe Savikataaq by e-mail.

Savikataaq shifted Flaherty to DM of Education from DM of Culture and Heritage in December 2018. Flaherty has also worked as Nunavut Arctic College’s director of Inuit language and culture.

Flaherty is the co-founder of Inhabit Media, which through Inhabit Education produces hundreds of books and teachers guides for the Department of Education’s program Inuktut Titiqqiriniq.

While working for government, Flaherty’s holdings were kept in a blind trust.

“Any matters pertaining to Inhabit will be dealt with by the ADM (assistant deputy minister) of Education, with oversight from the DM of Executive and Intergovernmental Affairs, so that no conflict of interest arises,” Catriona Macleod, Savikataaq’s press secretary, previously stated.

Inhabit Media, incorporated in 2006, is 100 per cent Inuit-owned. The company aims to preserve traditional knowledge and promote Northern talent, and to create more accessible and relevant educational resources for Nunavut children.

“I grew up not having intricately illustrated books with my language in my culture,” Flaherty has previously stated to Nunavut News.

Flaherty is originally from Clyde River and has long been a passionate language advocate.

“Early on, Louise was fortunate to be surrounded by great storytellers. Her grandparents instilled in her a passion for Inuktitut, and an understanding that speaking Inuktitut is a fundamental part of Inuit identity,” according to her biography on the Inhabit Media website.